Carbin dating

As soon as it dies, however, the C ration gets smaller.In other words, we have a ‘clock’ which starts ticking at the moment something dies.by Dr Carl Wieland An attempt to explain this very important method of dating and the way in which, when fully understood, it supports a ‘short’ timescale.In fact, the whole method is a giant ‘clock’ which seems to put a very young upper limit on the age of the atmosphere.Think of it like a teaspoon of cocoa mixed into a cake dough—after a while, the ‘ratio’ of cocoa to flour particles would be roughly the same no matter which part of the cake you sampled.The fact that the C doesn’t matter in a living thing—because it is constantly exchanging carbon with its surroundings, the ‘mixture’ will be the same as in the atmosphere and in all living things.The article is in straightforward language and the non-technical reader could profitably work through it., we find that this ration is the same if we sample a leaf from a tree, or a part of your body.

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Archaeologists use the exponential, radioactive decay of carbon 14 to estimate the death dates of organic material.

The stable form of carbon is carbon 12 and the radioactive isotope carbon 14 decays over time into nitrogen 14 and other particles.

This assumption is backed by numerous scientific studies and is relatively sound.

However, conditions may have been different in the past and could have influenced the rate of decay or formation of radioactive elements.